Hall of Fame
Oklahoma State's legacy of excellence on the diamond has been one of the mainstays of college baseball for decades. OSU won the 1959 national championship, and has appeared in the championship game six times. The Cowboys have made 19 trips to the College World Series, which ranks fifth all-time. Gary Ward's teams dominated the Big Eight Conference, capturing an NCAA-record 16 consecutive league crowns from 1981-96. The Cowboys won a record 23 Big Eight championships from 1953-96.
College Baseball Hall of Fame
Pete Incaviglia
Outfielder, 1983-85
Pebble Beach, Calif.
College Baseball Hall of Fame (2007)
OSU Baseball Hall of Fame (1992)

Incaviglia is the most recognized power hitter in Oklahoma State and NCAA baseball history. He had the most impressive offensive year in NCAA history as a junior in 1985 in which he set NCAA single-season records for home runs (48), RBIs (143), total bases (285) and slugging percentage (1.140). He set the NCAA career records for home runs (100) and slugging percentage (.915) and holds the Big Eight career records for RBIs (324) and total bases (635).

He was named first-team All-America in 1984 and 1985 by the American Baseball Coaches Association, The Sporting News and Baseball America. Incaviglia was also named first-team All-Big Eight by the conference coaches in 1984 and 1985. He is one of only two players who were ever voted the Most Valuable Player of the Big Eight Tournament twice, earning the honor in 1984 and repeating in 1985.

He was a first-round draft choice of the Montreal Expos in the 1985 amateur draft and the 15th player selected overall. Traded from Montreal to Texas for two players.

Incaviglia was one of only five position players since the draft began in 1965 to go directly from amateur baseball to the major leagues.

He played for the Texas Rangers from 1986-1990 and closed out his Ranger career ranked second all-time in home runs (124) and seventh all-time in RBIs (388). He tied a Rangers record with 30 home runs in his rookie season and had a team-leading 83 RBIs, and he was named to TOPPS and Baseball Digest all-rookie teams. Incaviglia became the first Ranger to reach 100 home runs in four seasons and just the 49th player in major league history to reach 100 home runs in his first four seasons.

Incaviglia played for the Detroit Tigers in 1991 and the Houston Astros in 1992 before signing with Philadelphia Phillies in 1993. He hit .274 with 24 home runs and a career-high 89 RBIs during the 1993 regular season. He spent 1994 and 1996 with the Phillies with a stint in Japan during the 1995 year.

Incaviglia spent 1996 and part of 1997 with the Baltimore Orioles before finishing the year with the New York Yankees. In 1998, he signed with the Tigers and played in seven games before moving on to Houston for his second tour of duty. He participated in the postseason with the Astros.

Incaviglia retired in 1999 after going to spring training with the Arizona Diamondbacks.

On Jan. 14, 1999, Incaviglia was named college baseball's Player of the Century by Baseball America.
 

Cowboy Baseball Legacy
1959 National Champions
College World Series
Conference Championships
Hall of Fame Cowboys
All-Americans
In the Pros
 

OSU outfielder Pete Incaviglia is remembered as one of the greatest hitters in college baseball history. He was named the college baseball "Player of the Century" by Baseball America.
 
Robin Ventura
Third Base, 1986-88
Santa Maria, Calif.
College Baseball Hall of Fame (2006)
OSU Baseball Hall of Fame (1998)

Truly one of the greatest collegiate baseball players of all time, Ventura finished third in Baseball America's "Player of the Century" poll for college baseball, and in 2006 was elected into the inaugural class of the College Baseball Hall of Fame.

Ventura still holds college baseball's hitting-streak record at 58 games while boasting a .428 career batting average.

In addition to the aforementioned feats, Ventura holds seven OSU records, including the highest single season batting average at .469.

Ventura had an unbelievable freshman year in which he hit .469 with 21 homers and 96 RBIs and earned All-America honors at third base. Named Freshman of the Year by Baseball America, his 96 RBIs led the nation, and he also led the team with his 28 doubles and 21 dingers. He established the school record for runs in a season with 107, which also led the nation. Other honors bestowed to the freshman included All-Big Eight and Big Eight Tournament MVP honors.

Ventura proved that there would be no sophomore slump as he was named Baseball America's Player of the Year in 1987 after hitting .428 with 21 homers and 110 RBIs. It was in this season that he set the record of 58 consecutive games with a hit. He once again claimed All-America and All-Big Eight honors and was the Big Eight Tournament MVP after going 11-for-12.

Ventura led the Cowboys into postseason play, where he was named to the Mideast All-Tournament team as he hit .417 and led the Cowboys to the College World Series. OSU lost to Stanford in the championship game, but Ventura was one of the bright spots as he went 4-for-5 in the contest.

Ventura's junior year was icing on the cake for his storybook collegiate career. The Cowboys set a school record with a 61-8 mark in 1988 and once again Ventura was named an All-American. He batted .391 with 26 homers and 96 RBIs.

He was named to the All-Big Eight team received the Golden Spikes Award as the best player in college baseball for the 1988 season.

Ventura played in the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, Korea, and was drafted by the Chicago White Sox with the 10th pick in the first round. He made his major league debut with Chicago in September of 1989.

On Sept. 4, 1995, Ventura became the eighth player in major-league history to hit two grand slams in one game, and his 167 home runs as a third baseman are a Chicago franchise record.

After 10 seasons with the White Sox, the five-time Gold Glove winner signed with the New York Mets in 1999 and helped lead them to the National League Championship Series. He batted .301 with 32 homers and 120 RBIs in 1999 and was in the running for National League MVP honors.

Ventura made the All-Star team in 2002 as a member of the New York Yankees and retired in 2004 after 16 seasons in the majors.
 


Declared 1987's player of the year by Baseball America, Robin Ventura has done it all. Ventura was a 3-time All-American at OSU, a Golden Spikes award winner, five-time Golden Glove award winner, and played for the United States in the Olympic games.
 
Gary Ward
Head Coach, 1978-96
Ramona, Okla.
College Baseball Hall of Fame (2008)
OSU Baseball Hall of Fame (2004)

Gary Ward, the architect of 16 straight Big Eight Conference championships spanning three decades, was inducted into the Cowboy Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004.

Ward was Oklahoma State's head baseball coach from 1978 through 1996 and guided the Cowboys to an unprecedented 16 straight conference titles, 17 NCAA regional appearances and 10 trips to the College World Series. Seven of OSU's World Series appearances (1981-87) were in consecutive years, an NCAA record. The Cowboys also appeared in the NCAA championship game three times under Ward.

He compiled a record of 953-313-1 in 19 seasons in Stillwater, before retiring prior to the 1997 campaign. Ward came out of retirement and was the head coach for two seasons at his alma mater New Mexico State in 2001 and 2002, leading the Aggies to the Sun Belt Tournament championship and an NCAA appearance in 2002. Ward's career record of 1,022-361-1 (.739) is 13th best all-time in win percentage and 24th in the NCAA record books in wins.

Gary Ward helped Oklahoma State recapture its role among the most respected and well-known programs in the nation.

108 of his players at OSU went on to sign professional contracts and nine were named first team All-America, while countless others received second and third team plaudits during his coaching tenure.

Recognized as a leading authority on hitting, Ward's energetic and enthusiastic approach and demonstrations are still in constant demand at baseball clinics throughout the country.

Ward came to Oklahoma State in 1977 after seven successful seasons at Yavapai Junior College in Prescott, Ariz. Yavapai won two national championships and Ward finished with a 240-83 record, a winning percentage of .743. Following his two national championships in 1975 and 1977, Ward was named the NJCAA Coach Of The Year.

His influence and accomplishments extend beyond the playing field at Oklahoma State. Ward was the driving force behind the planning, funding, design and construction of Allie P. Reynolds Stadium, and his leadership helped raise the necessary funds for stadium improvements in 1995.
 


For 19 years, Gary Ward was the face of Oklahoma State Baseball. Ward recorded over 950 wins during his time in Stillwater, and coached the Cowboys to 10 College World Series appearances, including three appearances in the NCAA championship game. Ward's Cowboys won an NCAA-record 16 consecutive conference championships.
 
Tom Borland
LHP, 1953-55
McAlester, Okla.
College Baseball Hall of Fame (2013)
OSU Baseball Hall of Fame (1998)

Borland was a stalwart pitcher on Oklahoma State's team from 1953 through 1955. The lefthander posted a sparkling 19-2 record during his career, which included a perfect 11-0 mark in 1955.

Borland helped lead the Cowboys to two College World Series in 1954 and 1955. He posted a 8-2 record with a 2.50 earned run average in 1954 while striking out 100 batters in 104 innings pitched. Oklahoma State went 18-11 that season and followed that up with a 27-3 record in the 1955 campaign.

Borland was a dominating force for the Cowboys in 1955 with a 2.13 earned run average and an impressive 143 strikeouts in 117 2/3 innings.

He was named a first team All-American according to the American Baseball Coaches' Association, while leading the Cowboys to the College World Series.

At the CWS, Borland capped off his collegiate career by being named the Most Valuable Player and was also on the All-Tournament team.

Borland went on to sign with the Boston Red Sox after the 1955 season and played for two seasons at the major-league level (1960-61).
 


Left-handed pitcher Tom Borland was a dominating force on the mound for the Cowboys and helped lead Oklahoma A&M to back-to-back College World Series appearances in 1954 and 1955. Borland compiled a 19-2 record and 2.63 ERA during his three seasons in Stillwater.
 
Cowboy Baseball Hall of Fame
Jerry Adair
Infielder, 1957-58
Sand Springs, Okla.
Class of 2001

Adair, a native of Sand Springs, Okla., was a two-sport star for the Cowboys during his stay in Stillwater from 1955-58. Adair was a starting guard on the Oklahoma State basketball team in his sophomore and junior seasons and also started at shortstop on the baseball diamond in the 1957 and 1958 seasons.

In his two seasons at OSU, he combined to hit .387 with 17 doubles and 34 RBIs and helped lead the Cowboys to a 29-9 record in that span.

In basketball, he teamed with All-American Arlen Clark to lead Oklahoma State to a 38-17 record on the court while averaging 11 points per game. Adair began his OSU career in 1955-56 playing on the freshman squads in baseball and basketball.

In 1957, he hit .311 for the baseball team with five doubles and 15 runs scored in 61 at-bats. He was third on the hoops team in scoring averaging just under 10 points a game at 9.7.

In his junior season Adair fared well in both sports leading the Cowboy baseball team with a .438 batting average with 12 doubles and 26 RBIs. The team finished 17-6 on the diamond and Adair earned second team All-American honors from the American Baseball Coaches Association. He was also the first Cowboy to earn All-Big Eight plaudits in 1958, the first year that Oklahoma State was in the conference.

Adair finished second in scoring on the 1957-58 basketball team, averaging 11.9 points per game, just ahead of teammate and former OSU head coach Eddie Sutton who averaged 8.3 points per game.

After the 1958 baseball season Adair decided to sign a professional baseball contract with the Baltimore Orioles. He played nine seasons with the Orioles before signing with the Chicago White Sox in 1966. After two seasons with the White Sox, Adair spent two seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1967-68) before finishing his major league career with the Kansas City Royals in 1970.

He finished his major league career with a .254 batting average with 57 homers, 163 doubles and 366 RBIs. Jerry Adair passed away in Tulsa, Okla. on May 31, 1987 at the age of 51.
 

Bruce Andrew
Infielder, 1959-61
Stillwater, Okla.
Class of 1997

Andrew, a Stillwater native who played second base, was a member of the 1959 national championship team.

He led the 1959 team in at bats, triples and stolen bases. He was in the top three in hits, RBIs, runs and hit by pitches. In 1960, he led the team in most defensive categories.

In 1961, he was once again the team captain, and he had a .400 batting average. In his tenure, the Cowboys were 71-15. He was named to two College World Series All-Tournament teams, twice was selected as a all-Big Eight selection and was named All-American. He was drafted by the White Sox in 1959.
 

Jimmy Barragan
First Base, 1985-87
San Diego, Calif.
Class of 1999

Barragan was a fixture at first base for the Cowboys during the mid-1980's. He was a two-time All-American and All-Big Eight selection during his stay at Oklahoma State from 1985-87.

Barragan helped lead the Cowboys to three consecutive College World Series appearances and was named the Midwest Regional Most Valuable Player in 1986 and to the CWS All-Tournament team after the 1987 campaign.

Barragan ended his career with a .377 batting average with 54 home runs and 231 RBIs. He holds school records for hits in a game with six and putouts with 607.

The San Diego, Calif., native was selected in the 19th round of the 1987 draft by Philadelphia and played in the organization for four years and with the San Diego Padres for one season.
 

Jason Bell
RHP, 1993-95
Orlando, Fla.
Class of 2001

Bell was one of the top Cowboy pitchers of the 1990's and has his name scattered throughout the OSU record books.

He pitched at OSU from 1993-95 and posted a career record of 31-8 with a 3.60 ERA. Bell was a two-time All-American, receiving the award in both his junior and senior seasons.

The Orlando, Fla. native opened with a 5-2 record in his freshman season, winning his last four games and five of six decisions.

Bell continued his success into his sophomore year in 1994, finishing with a 14-2 ledger with a 3.30 ERA. He was named first team all-Midwest region, first team all-Big Eight and was a two-time Big Eight Player-of-the-Week. Bell was also tabbed a first team All-America by both Baseball America and the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association (NCBWA) and was a third team selection by the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA).

As a junior Bell posted a 12-4 mark on the mound with a 3.10 ERA and 120 strikeouts in 145 innings pitched. He was named a second team All-American by the NCBWA and a third team All-American by the ABCA and Collegiate Baseball. He was also a first team All-Big Eight selection and helped lead the Cowboys to a 46-19 record in 1995. Bell won 19 straight decisions from 1993-95, a Big Eight and school record, and also holds the Big Eight and school record for most innings pitched in a season, 145.0 in 1995. In addition he is also tied for first in starts in a season with 19 in 1995. His 14 wins in 1994 is second best in team history as is his 325.1 career innings pitched.

Bell was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the second round of the amateur baseball draft in 1995 and played in their organization from 1995-1999.

In 2000, Bell signed a contract with the Toronto Blue Jays and played for their Triple A affiliate, the Syracuse Sky Chiefs. Bell retired in 2000 and is currently the pitching coach at Penn State.
 

Brad Beanblossom
Infielder, 1987-90
Louisville, Ky.
Class of 2003

Beanblossom was a four-year starter in the infield from 1987-90 and played in a Big Eight and school record 271 games during his collegiate career.

The Louisville, Ky., native is also Oklahoma State's career leader in at bats with 941 and doubles with 75. He was the epitome of a student-athlete as well having been named a GTE Academic All-American three times with a perfect 4.00 GPA.

He was also an Academic All-Big Eight selection from 1988-90 and was an All-Big Eight pick in 1990. In addition, he was named to the College World Series All-Tournament Teams in 1987 and 1990.

The Cowboys went to the CWS in three of his four seasons in Stillwater, including championship game appearances in 1987 and 1990.

Beanblossom currently works for Louisville Slugger and resides in Louisville.
 

Jeff Bronkey
RHP, 1984-86
Klamath Falls, Ore.
Class of 1996

Bronkey was a star reliever for the Cowboys during the mid-1980s and participated on three College World Series teams.

The right-hander from Klamath Falls, Ore., posted a career record of 18-3 with a 3.67 ERA from 1984-86.

Bronkey's best season came in 1986 when he started the year as a reliever but was moved into a starter's role. He went 8-2 with a 2.89 ERA and 42 strikeouts in 56 innings pitched.

After the 1986 season, Bronkey was selected in the second round of the Major League Baseball Draft by the Minnesota Twins.

Bronkey broke into the majors with the Texas Rangers in 1993 and went 1-1 with a 4.00 ERA in 36 innings pitched.

Bronkey played with the Milwaukee Brewers during the 1994-95 seasons and finished his major-league career with a 2-2 ledger with a 4.04 ERA in 69 innings pitched.
 

Joe Buck
Catcher, 1950-51
Altus, Okla.
Class of 1992

Buck was the first Oklahoma State baseball player to earn All-America honors when he was selected to the American Baseball Coaches Association first team in 1951.

He led the team in 1951 with a .382 batting average and 22 RBIs. He also led the team with six doubles, six home runs and a .735 slugging percentage.

Buck hit .306 in 1950 and led the team with three triples. He had four doubles and two home runs for a slugging percentage of .494. Buck drew 16 walks and struck out only four times while scoring 27 runs. His leadership helped the Aggies win the Missouri Valley Conference Southern Division title.
 

Larry Burchart
RHP, 1966-67
Midwest City, Okla.
Class of 1994

Burchart lettered two years and helped Oklahoma State win two District V titles en route to two College World Series appearances.

He went 4-2 in a team-leading 72 innings pitched in 1966. Burchart posted two complete games while striking out 68 in those 72 innings, with an ERA of 2.63. Burchart won the first of two District V games on the way to a national runner-up finish at the College World Series.

In 1967, Burchart had a 5-2 record in another team-leading 60 innings pitched. Burchart also had five complete games and an ERA of 1.80.

Burchart was drafted by the Kansas City Athletics in the 20th round in 1966. In 1967, he was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first round of the January draft and in the third round of the June draft.

He was named to the TOPPS all-minor league team in 1967 after he finished with the year with a 9-1 record and a 1.95 ERA. His managers his first two years of professional baseball were Tommy Lasorda and Roger Craig.

In 1969, Burchart threw a no-hitter in the Puerto Rican Professional League and was named to the Puerto Rican All-Star team. During the summer, Burchart pitched for the Cleveland Indians of the American League. Burchart finished his professional career with the Wichita Areos in the American Association in 1970 and '71, with a 13-13 record.

Burchart's professional career was cut short due to an arm injury.
 

Jeromy Burnitz
Outfielder, 1988-90
Conroe, Texas
Class of 1996

Burnitz, who was originally from Conroe, Texas, was one of the big hitters on one of the greatest offensive teams in NCAA history. In his freshman season, he led the Cowboys with a .403 batting average. During his OSU career, he slugged 44 home runs and collected 186 RBIs. He was the 17th player drafted in 1990 by the New York Mets.

In 1998, Burnitz batted .263 with a career-high 38 homers and 125 RBIs for Milwaukee. In 1999, Burnitz continued to be a force at the plate, batting .270 with 33 homers and 103 RBIs for the Brewers. In 2000, he blasted 31 homers with 98 RBIs and hit 34 homers with 100 RBIs in 2001.

Burnitz played with seven different Major League organizations during his 14-year career and finished with 315 homers and 981 RBIs.
 

Michael Daniel
Catcher, 1990-91
Weatherford, Okla.
Class of 1994

One of OSU's all-time great catchers. Daniel led the Cowboys to two Big Eight Championships and a regional championship en route to a national runner-up finish at the College World Series in 1990.

Daniel was named second-team All-America in 1990 by the American Baseball Coaches Association and Baseball America.

In 1990, Daniel hit .362 with a team-leading 23 home runs and was the NCAA leader with 92 RBIs. He also compiled 155 total bases, and a slugging percentage of .791. He was named the Big Eight's Player of the Year, was All-Big Eight and also was named to the 1990 College World Series All-Tournament team. He was drafted in the eighth round by the Baltimore Orioles.

In 1991, Daniel was named first-team All-America by The Sporting News, Collegiate Baseball and Baseball America. He was also named second-team All-America by the ABCA.

In 1991, Daniel hit .360 with a team-leading 27 home runs and 107 RBIs. He also collected 170 total bases with a slugging percentage of .752. He was named All-Big Eight, Big Eight All-Tournament team, the Big Eight Tournament's MVP Big Eight Player of the Year, academic All-Big Eight, and was named to the Central I Regional All-Tournament team.

He was drafted in the fifth round by the Montreal Expos in 1991. Daniel played the summer in Jamestown, N.Y., where he hit .265 with eight home runs, had a league-leading 64 RBIs, and was selected to the New York-Penn League all-star team.

In 1992, he hit .220 with six home runs and 40 RBIs in West Palm Beach, Fla., but his season was cut short due to wrist surgery. In 1993, he returned to West Palm Beach and was promoted to Harrisburg (AA) where combined he hit .230 with eight home runs and 48 RBIs.

In 1994, he was picked up by the Minnesota Twins and sent to Nashville (AA), where he hit .258 with six home runs and 29 RBIs in 100 at bats. He was then released but picked up by the Florida Marlins and sent to Portland, Maine, where he hit .220 with six home runs and 20 RBIs.
 

Doug Dascenzo
Outfielder, 1984-85
Cleveland, Ohio
Class of 2002

Dascenzo provided the powerful offensive Cowboy teams of the mid-1980s with a base stealing threat that helped fuel the OSU juggernaut to College World Series appearances in 1984 and 1985.

Dascenzo transferred to Oklahoma State as a sophomore in 1984 after spending his freshman campaign at Florida College where he earned all-conference honors. He batted .370 with 52 stolen bases in junior college and was immediately plugged in as the Cowboys starting center fielder in 1984.

While College Player of the Century and teammate Pete Incaviglia was garnering most of the national spotlight for OSU, Dascenzo efficiently put together a solid year with a .316 batting average and set a Big Eight and school record with 52 stolen bases. He also tied for the team lead in doubles with 17 and scored 80 runs while also playing a superb center field for the Pokes committing only three errors in 71 games. OSU finished with a school record 61 wins in 1984 and advanced to the College World Series where they finished in third place.

Dascenzo returned for his junior year in 1985 and built upon his success of the previous year by batting .390 with a school and conference record 67 stolen bases in 71 games. He was second on the team with 90 walks and 20 doubles while also playing a near flawless center field with only one error while recording 130 putouts for a .993 fielding percentage. Dascenzo earned conference plaudits on the baseball diamond as well as in the classroom. In 1985, he was named to the All-Big Eight teams athletically and academically with a 3.31 grade point average in marketing. He also garnered All-Big Eight Tournament Team honors helping lead the Cowboys to their fifth straight Big Eight championship. Once again the team advanced to the College World Series where they finished fifth with an overall record of 58-16-1.

Dascenzo was drafted in the 12th round of the 1985 draft by the Chicago Cubs and signed with the team, ending his OSU career after two seasons. He left the Cowboys with a .353 batting average, 37 doubles and a school and Big Eight career record of 119 stolen bases.

The Cleveland native made his way up the Cubs organization and eventually hit the major leagues in 1988. He played in Chicago for four years, batting a career-high .255 in both the 1991 and 1992 seasons before signing with Texas in 1993 and playing one season for the Rangers. Dascenzo finished his major league career with San Diego in 1996.
 

Mike Day
Catcher, 1982-85
Piqua, Ohio
Class of 1997

Day was one of the catalysts for the Cowboys from 1982-85. He stands near the top of the Cowboys career leader charts in walks (198), runs (178) and games played (191).

A career .328 hitter, Day led the Cowboys in hitting in 1984 with a .375 average. He capped his career with a senior season that saw him hit .309 with 16 home runs, 90 RBIs and 178 runs. He also set OSU's single-season record with 102 base on balls.

Along with the .328 batting average, Day finished his career with 20 homers and 149 RBIs.

He was twice All-Big Eight both on the field and in the classroom.

Day was a 13th-round draft pick of the Montreal Expos.
 

Darren Dilks
LHP/DH, 1979-81
Ontario, Calif.
Class of 1993

Dilks had the top hitter/pitcher combination in school and Big Eight history.

He went 9-1 with a 3.15 ERA in 1980. Dilks made 13 appearances, including 11 starts, and finished with four complete games and a team-leading 90 strikeouts in 65 2/3 innings. He allowed only 38 base hits and threw a one-hit shutout against Kansas State on May 3, 1980. Dilks also played first base and outfield, hitting .358 with a team-leading and school-record 17 doubles, four home runs and 36 RBIs for the year.

Dilks helped lead Oklahoma State to the 1981 College World Series, its first since 1968. He was the workhorse of the pitching staff, making 18 appearances including a team-high 16 starts. He went 7-2 with an ERA of 3.72 and led the team with a school-record 153 strikeouts in a team-high and school-record 121 innings. Dilks finished with a team-leading eight complete games including a 9-0 shutout of Illinois. He hit .336 with eight doubles, three triples and nine home runs while driving in 38 runs.

Dilks scored a run and had an RBI in the 1981 NCAA Championship game against Arizona State. He came on in relief in the sixth inning, and worked two scoreless innings allowing three hits and striking out three.

He was voted as the Most Valuable Player of the 1981 Big Eight Tournament and was named first-team All-Big Eight by the league coaches as the designated hitter.

Dilks was drafted in the first round of the 1981 amateur draft by the Montreal Expos, and was the 18th player chosen overall. He finished his career with 243 strikeouts in 186 2/3 innings, placing him second in the career record books in strikeouts.
 

Bill Dobbs
LHP, 1967-69
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Class of 1998

Bill Dobbs was a solid pitcher who helped lead the Cowboys to two College World Series in 1967 and 1968.

Dobbs consistently improved as a pitcher during his career and turned into a dominant force in his senior campaign.

As a sophomore in 1967, the lefthander went 4-3 with a 3.29 ERA. Dobbs struck out an impressive 64 batters in 54 1/3 innings of work. The Cowboys made it to the College World Series and finished seventh.

In 1968, Dobbs continued his rise to stardom, finishing with a 6-3 mark with a 2.91 ERA in 62 innings pitched. Once again Oklahoma State made it to the World Series, where they finished fifth.

As a senior in 1969, Dobbs was virtually untouchable, posting a sparkling 7-1 mark with a 1.89 ERA. He pitched seven complete games and struck out 90 batters in 71 1/3 innings. He was named a first-team All-Big Eight selection for his efforts.
 

Jim Dobson
3B/OF, 1959-61
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Class of 2000

Dobson was a standout offensive performer for the Cowboys and helped lead the Cowboys to postseason appearances in each of his three seasons in Stillwater.

Dobson, nicknamed "The Dobber", was named the most outstanding player of the 1959 College World Series when the Pokes captured their first and only national title. As a sophomore that season he batted .342 with seven homers and 29 RBIs in 111 at-bats. He earned All-Big Eight plaudits that season and batted clean-up in the championship game against Arizona. Dobson went 2-for-4 in the game with a solo home run as the Pokes won the game 5-3.

As a junior, Dobson went through an offensive slump batting only .178 but he still managed to belt six homers in 79 at-bats. He was named to the All-Big Eight team for the second straight time, but this time it was as an outfielder. The Cowboys once again made the CWS and went 2-2 at the tourney and finished third.

Dobson once again helped lead the Cowboys to the CWS championship game as a senior, earning All-Big Eight honors. He batted .309 and led the team for the third-straight season in homers with six. He also led the club in doubles with nine and RBIs with 31. Oklahoma State and Dobson just fell short of winning their second national championship in three years, as the Pokes lost to Southern California 1-0.

In addition to his baseball exploits, Dobson was also a two-year letter winner on the Oklahoma State football team before deciding to concentrate solely on baseball his senior year. Dobson signed a professional contract with the Cleveland Indians organization after the 1961 season.
 

Danny Doyle
Catcher, 1938-40
Dale, Okla.
Class of 1993

Doyle lettered three years in both baseball and basketball for Henry P. Iba from 1937-1940. The Dale, Okla. native led OSU in hitting as a sophomore in 1938 with .431 batting average. He had five doubles, a triple, three home runs and 23 RBIs. He also stole six bases and scored 21 runs in the 17-game season that saw OSU finish 13-4.

The catcher for one of OSU's greatest pitching staffs that included Reinhold Feldkamp, Allie Reynolds, Cy Eppler and Eph Williams, he became the second OSU baseball player to sign a professional contract when he joined the Boston Red Sox in 1942. He played with Louisville during the 1942 and 1943 seasons, and was called up to finish the season with Boston both years.

He was stationed with the Air Force at both Enid and Stillwater in World War II carrying postgraduate work at OSU during the 1943-44 academic year. Under wartime eligibility rules, he received a fourth year of eligibility for varsity basketball. It was during the 1943-44 season that Bob Kurland became a player, making All-America in 1944. It was written that Doyle helped the legendary Mr. Iba develop the big player during that time. Doyle returned to Louisville in 1946 and again finished the season with Boston. He then elected to take the head basketball coaching job at Auburn University while remaining a part-time scout for the Red Sox.

He returned to Stillwater in 1949 and became a full-time scout for the Red Sox. Except three years with the New York Yankees from 1964-1967, he stayed with the Red Sox until his retirement following the 1990 baseball season. His territory during more than 40 years with the Red Sox included Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, Texas (except the Houston area) and as an advance scout of the Texas Rangers.

He was named by members of the Scouts Association the Midwest Scout of the Year in 1988. The nominees must have more than 20 years of full-time scouting experience and must have been nominated by their organization's scouting director. The Scout of the Year award recognizes excellence in scouting, years of service, and professionalism in the performance of job.

In his 40 years of service with the Red Sox, Doyle's most notable signees were pitchers Roger Clemens and Jim Lonborg and outfielder Ellis Burks. Clemens and Lonborg both won the Cy Young Award while pitching for the Red Sox.
 

Monty Fariss
Shortstop, 1986-88
Leedey, Okla.
Class of 1994

Fariss was one of the most honored offensive players in Oklahoma State history. He helped OSU win three-straight Big Eight titles and two NCAA regional titles en route to two NCAA College World Series appearances in 1986 and 1987.

As a freshman in 1986, Fariss hit .286 with 12 home runs, 18 doubles, five triples, 58 RBIs, 126 total bases and a slugging percentage of .581, and he was named to the Big Eight All-Tournament team.

In 1987, Fariss hit .303 with 23 home runs, 13 doubles and one triple. He drove in 75 runs while scoring 96. He drew a team-leading 92 walks and had 155 total bases with a slugging percentage of .662. He was also named Academic All-Big Eight.

In 1988, Fariss hit .397 with 30 home runs, 114 RBIs, 208 total bases and an .860 slugging percentage, all of which rank among the single-season leaders in OSU history. He was named All-Big Eight and first-team All-America by The Sporting News and Baseball America.

Fariss was drafted in the first round as the sixth overall pick by the Texas Rangers in 1988 and made his major league debut in September of 1990. He had a game-winning, three-run double in the bottom of the ninth on Sept. 8, 1990 and hit his first major-league homer off Bill Krueger on Sept. 30, 1991.
 

John Farrell
RHP, 1981-84
Monmouth Beach, N.J.
Class of 1994

Farrell lettered four years and helped Oklahoma State win four Big Eight and four NCAA regional titles en route to four College World Series appearances.

He went 20-6 with 168 strikeouts in 219 innings pitched with an ERA of 4.51 in his college career. In 1984, Farrell set an OSU record by throwing five shutouts, including a no-hitter vs. Missouri Southern. Farrell was drafted by the Cleveland Indians in the second round. He started his professional career in Waterloo (A) but, after nine starts, was promoted to Maine (AA), where he was 2-1 in five starts with an ERA of 3.76.

In 1985, he was invited to spring training as a non-roster player but was optioned to Waterbury (AA), where he was 7-13 with a 5.19 ERA in 25 starts.

In 1987, Farrell started the season in Buffalo and was 9-12 with an ERA of 5.83 before being called up to Cleveland. On Aug. 21 he defeated the Detroit Tigers, 5-3, hurling a six-hit complete game. He compiled a 3-0 record with a 1.33 ERA in August and began his career 4-0 with a 1.59 ERA.

In 1988, Farrell set a career best with 14 wins, ranked second on the club. He tossed his first shutout on Aug. 11. In 1989, he set a career best in ERA (3.63) in 31 starts with seven complete games. In 1990, Farrell went 4-5 with a 4.28 ERA in 17 games before being put on the disabled list.

In 1991 and '92, he did not play due to surgery and rehabilitation. In 1993, Farrell made a comeback with the California Angels and went 3-12 with a 7.35 ERA before being optioned to Vancouver, where he was 4-5 with a 3.09 ERA. Farrell ended his major-league career with the Detroit Tigers on July 10, 1996. He was an assistant coach at Oklahoma State from 1997-01 before joining the Cleveland Indians as the Director of Player Development. He joined the Boston Red Sox staff in 2006 as the pitching coach.
 

Littleton Fowler
LHP, 1961-63
Texarkana, Texas
Class of 1996

Littleton Fowler proved from the very start of his collegiate career that he was a pitcher to be reckoned with.

In his sophomore campaign in 1961, Fowler posted a 7-1 mark with a 1.93 ERA and helped lead the Cowboys to the 1961 College World Series. At the CWS, he proved to be a dominant force and was named to the All-Tournament team and was the Most Valuable Player. Fowler's only loss came in the championship game as the Cowboys fell to Southern California, 1-0.

In 1962, Fowler went 0-2 with a 7.08 ERA but he rebounded in his senior season with a 4-3 ledger with a 3.14 ERA as Oklahoma State finished the season with a 15-10 record.
 

Gary Green
Shortstop, 1981-84
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Class of 1999

Green played from 1981-84 and was a four-year starter at shortstop for the Cowboys.

Green helped lead Oklahoma State to the first four of seven consecutive College World Series and was named to the CWS All-Tournament team in 1984.

He earned All-American plaudits after the 1984 season and twice was named to the All-Big Eight team after the 1982 and 1984 seasons.

He finished his Oklahoma State career with a .335 batting average with 121 RBIs and 70 stolen bases. Green was a member of the United States Olympic team in 1984 and was drafted in the first round that same year by the San Diego Padres.

He played professionally for the Padres, Texas Rangers and Cincinnati Reds.
 

Mike Henneman
RHP, 1983-84
Festus, Mo.
Class of 1993

Henneman lettered two years and helped Oklahoma State win two Big Eight and two NCAA Regional titles en route to two College World Series appearances.

He went 7-2 with a team-leading two saves and an ERA of 4.37 in 1984. Henneman had two complete games and a shutout while striking out 56 in 70 innings. He threw one of two no-hitters recorded by the Cowboys in 1984 when he blanked Iowa State, 7-0, on March 4. In 1983, he went 4-4 and led the team with four saves. He also had a pair of complete games and finished with 60 strikeouts in 64 1/3 innings.

Henneman combined duty as both a starter and a reliever in 1983 and 1984 and finished with team-leading and school-record 23 appearances each season. He tied for fourth in the career saves record book with six. He was drafted in the fourth round of the 1984 Major League Baseball Draft by Detroit.

In 1987, Henneman made his major league debut with Detroit. He earned his first major league victory on May 15, 1987 against Cleveland with 5.1 innings of one-hit, scoreless relief. Henneman won his first eight decisions en route to an 11-3 record with seven saves and an ERA of 2.98 in 55 appearances.

He led the Tiger relief corps in 1988 with a 9-6 record and 22 saves in 65 appearances. He converted 22-of-29 save opportunities and tied for the league lead in relief wins (9). He earned saves in seven-straight appearances and was the first Tiger to do so since John Hiller in 1973.

In 1989, he led the Tiger staff with an 11-4 record and was the first relief pitcher to do so since 1974. He was not scored upon in 40 of his 60 appearances, and he was named to the American League All-Star team for the first time.

In 1990, he made a career-high 69 appearances and recorded 22 saves for the second time in three years. Henneman pitched 90-plus innings for the fourth consecutive season and made 60-plus appearances for the third-straight season.

Henneman went 10-2 with an ERA of 2.88 and 21 saves in 1991, and in 1992 he led the club with 24 saves, becoming the first Tiger in history to post 20 saves in four different seasons. He tied his career-high with 24 saves in 1993 and was 5-3 with a team-leading 2.64 ERA.

After recording a combined 26 saves in the 1994-95 seasons with the Tigers, he was traded to Houston where he finished the season.

He played for the Texas Rangers in 1996, his final campaign, and finished with a career-high 31 saves.
 

Josh Holliday
C/INF, 1996-99
Stillwater, Okla.
Class of 2003

Holliday was a four-year starter for the Cowboys and helped lead OSU to two College World Series appearances from 1996-99. He spent three years as an assistant coach on the Cowboy staff after a two-year career in professional baseball with the Toronto Blue Jays organization.

His name is peppered throughout the OSU record books including homers, runs, walks and hit by pitches. Holliday fared well on and off the field, receiving academic and athletic conference honors after each of his four seasons in Stillwater. He was named the OSU Male Student Athlete of the Year in 1999 recognizing his achievements on and off the baseball diamond.
 

Joel Horlen
RHP, 1958-59
San Antonio, Texas
Class of 1993

Horlen lettered two years in baseball and helped lead OSU to its only national championship in baseball in 1959. He was 6-3 in 1958 and led the team in strikeouts with 52 in 66.2 innings. He tied for the team lead in wins and was the team leader in innings pitched and complete games with seven.

Horlen went 9-1 with an ERA of 2.23 during 1959 and tied for the team lead in wins. He led the team in strikeouts with 76 and complete games with eight.

He was a first-team All-Big Eight choice by league coaches and a second-team All-America by the American Baseball Coaches Association in 1959. He was the winning pitcher in the second game of a double-header sweep of Bradley to help the Aggies qualify for the College World Series.

Horlen opened the College World Series for OSU and threw a five-hitter in a 10-2 win over Western Michigan. He struck out nine and allowed only two earned runs. After OSU lost to Arizona, he came back against Penn State in the elimination game and threw another complete game to pick up his second victory of the tournament as the Cowboys rallied for two runs in the ninth to win 4-3. He allowed just two earned runs on nine hits and struck out nine. He also went 2-for-4 with a run scored.

Horlen was named to the all-tournament team, finishing with a tournament-leading 2-0 record, an ERA of 1.99 and a tournament-leading 18 strikeouts.

Horlen signed with the Chicago White Sox following the 1959 season and played for Chicago until he was signed as a free agent by Oakland in 1972. He played in the major leagues from 1961-1972, finishing with a 116-117 record and an ERA of 3.11 in 361 appearances.

His finest season came in 1967 when he finished 19-7 with a league-leading 2.06 ERA. Horlen also led the league in winning percentage (.731) and tied for the league lead in shutouts with six and was selected to play in the 1967 All-Star Game.

The highlight of his 1967 season came on Sept. 10 when he threw a no-hitter against Detroit in the midst of the pennant race.

Horlen went 3-4 with an ERA of 3.00 and one save in 32 appearances with the Athletics in 1972. He appeared in both the American League Championship Series and the World Series as the Athletics won the 1972 world championship.

Following his playing days, Horlen remained involved in baseball as both a minor league coach and instructor. After retiring from baseball, he started the intercollegiate golf program at the University of Texas at San Antonio in 1983. He served as the golf coach at UTSA from 1983-1986.
 

Jim Ifland
1B/DH, 1986-87
Santa Cruz, Calif.
Class of 1998

Jim Ifland only played two seasons for the Cowboys but left a mark on the program that will never be forgotten.

Ifland came to Stillwater as a junior-college transfer from San Jose City College and quickly established himself as a starter at the designated hitter spot. He batted between Hall of Famers Robin Ventura (1998) and Jimmy Barragan (1999).

As a junior, Ifland batted .366 with 14 homers and 71 RBIs. For his efforts, he was named to the All-Big Eight first team and to the All-Tournament team as well. Oklahoma State went to the College World Series, where they finished fourth, falling to Florida State by a narrow 6-5 margin.

Ifland and the Pokes vowed to do even better in 1987 and he continued his solid play into his senior season. The switch hitter continued to impress at the plate where he batted .387 with 15 homers and 90 RBIs. Ifland was once again named an All-Big Eight selection as Oklahoma State finished with an impressive 59-13 ledger. The Cowboys advanced into the championship game but fell to Stanford, 9-5. Ifland went 1-4 in his final collegiate game with a home run and two RBIs.
 

Frank Kellert
P/1B, 1947-49
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Class of 2003

The late Frank Kellert Sr. played baseball at OSU from 1947-49 and played in the major leagues for four seasons in the mid-1950's. He helped lead Oklahoma A&M to the NCAA tournament in each season he played and played in the All-American amateur game at Fenway Park in 1947.

He actually signed a pro contract with St. Louis as a pitcher in 1949, but suffered an arm injury that forced him to play first base exclusively. His professional career lasted until the 1959 season when he retired and moved back to Oklahoma City. Among the highlights of his professional baseball career was a famous play at home plate involving his teammate with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Jackie Robinson. Kellert was at bat in 1955 when Robinson stole home against the New York Yankees, and the play is shown to visitors to the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. He worked for Wilson Co. in Oklahoma City, where he was the credit union superintendent, until his death in 1976.
 

Dennis Livingston
LHP, 1982-84
North Reading, Mass.
Class of 2000

Dennis Livingston is considered one of the top Cowboy pitchers of all-time with his name peppered throughout the OSU record books. The North Reading, Mass., native was a two-time All-America (1982-83) and earned All-Big Eight honors in 1983-84.

Livingston began his Cowboy career as the closer and recorded an OSU single season record of 10 saves on his way to an 8-2 ledger and a 2.29 ERA. In 26 appearances he struck out 77 batters in 55 innings pitched.

Livingston proved his freshman season was no fluke as he was moved into the starting rotation and was named a preseason All-America. He proceeded to set the OSU single season record for wins in a season with 15 against only three losses. He threw eight complete games and recorded an OSU single season record 180 strikeouts in 135 innings pitched while sporting a 3.00 earned run average. Livingston came up big in the NCAA tournament posting wins over Wichita State in the Midwest Regionals and Stanford in the College World Series.

As a junior in 1984, Livingston went 10-3 with a 4.54 ERA in 16 starts. He led the team with 103 innings pitched and tied for the team lead with 87 strikeouts.

The Cowboys made the College World Series in all of his three seasons at OSU and he finished his career with a 33-8 record with 344 strikeouts, both of which are school records. Livingston's name also appears in the OSU record books in starts in a season (19, T-1st) and innings pitched in a season (135.0, 3rd).

Livingston was drafted with the 23rd pick in the first round of the 1984 draft by the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Former Cowboy head coach Tom Holliday said it best: "Dennis Livingston was just as an important person to us on the pitching staff as Pete Incaviglia was to us offensively in reestablishing Oklahoma State as one of the powers in college baseball in the early 1980's."
 

Dan Massari
First Base, 1972-75
Lancaster, Calif.
Class of 2001

Massari played for the Cowboys from 1972-75 and was one of the bright spots for OSU baseball in the mid-1970's.

As a freshman in 1972 he batted .301 and led the team with 20 RBIs. He followed a solid first year by hitting at a .342 clip as a sophomore with five homers and 34 RBIs and earned All-Big Eight plaudits.

Massari slumped at the plate in his junior season with a .168 batting average, yet he still managed to hit five homers and knock in 22 runs in 41 games. He was stellar in the field at first base with a sparkling .994 fielding percentage as a junior after sporting a .993 percentage as a sophomore.

The Lancaster, Calif., native rebounded at the plate in his senior season, leading the team with a .410 average to go along with six homers and 40 RBIs. Massari was named a second team All-American by the American Baseball Coaches Association in 1975 and also earned All-Big Eight honors as well. He was drafted in the 10th round by the San Francisco Giants in the 1975 amateur baseball draft but opted to complete his college education at Oklahoma State.

After graduating in December of 1976, Massari signed with the Cleveland Indians in the winter draft and played in the organization until 1979.

He went on to play in national racquetball tournaments until entering chiropractic school in 1983. Dr. Massari's practice is called Athletic Injury Management (AIM) Group based in Lancaster, Calif., where he has been a chiropractor since 1986. He has two sons and coaches youth baseball in California in his spare time.
 

Bill Platt
Radio announcer 1958-1995
Class of 1996
 

Bill Platt was the "Voice of OSU Baseball" for 38 years from 1958-95. Mr. Platt was general manager of KSPI radio in Stillwater for more than 35 years and was inducted into the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 1989.

Platt was named Oklahoma Broadcaster of the Year five times. He also was a former president of the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters. He attended about 1,600 baseball games.

Mr. Platt passed away in 1997 leaving behind a legacy that is still cherished today.
 

Tim Pugh
RHP, 1986-89
Bartlesville, Okla.
Class of 1997

Pugh is one of the best pitchers in Cowboy history.

He ranks in the top five in single-season wins with 15, innings pitched with 113.2 and strikeouts with 104.

He is also in the charts in career starts with 47, innings pitched with 312.1, strikeouts with 260, and is first in career wins with 33.

He was twice named All-Big Eight and earned All-American status.

He was drafted in the sixth round of the 1989 draft by the Cincinnati Reds.

After a six-year stint in the majors, Pugh retired from baseball because of an arm injury.
 

Allie P. Reynolds
RHP, 1936-38
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Class of 1992

Reynolds was one of the first Oklahoma State baseball players to become a professional when he signed a contract with the Cleveland Indians in 1939, turning down the New York Giants, who drafted him in the third round of the National Football League draft.

He attended then-Oklahoma A&M on a track scholarship and ran the 100-yard dash, participated in the broad jump and threw the javelin. He was the starting fullback in the single-wing offense for the Aggies in his senior year and played halfback as a freshman, sophomore and junior in the wing formation.

His baseball talent was discovered by Henry P. Iba, who asked him to throw batting practice while he recovered from a knee injury suffered in football. Without benefit of any warm-up, he struck out the first four batters he faced, without a single hitter making contact.

He played in the major leagues for Cleveland from 1942-1946 when the Indians traded him to the New York Yankees at the request of Joe DiMaggio. Reynolds played for the Yankees from 1947-1954 and helped the team win six World Championships.

He pitched in 15 World Series games, and won seven of his nine starts, picking up four saves in six relief appearances. Reynolds struck out 62 batters in 77 1/3 innings and finished his career with a 2.79 ERA and two shutouts in World Series games. His career was tragically cut short by a back injury suffered when the team's charter bus collided with an overpass.

Reynolds was named to the American League All-Star team six times from 1949-1954. He became only the third person in major league history to throw two no-hit games in a single season in 1951. He defeated Cleveland, 1-0, on July 12, and then beat Boston, 8-0, on September 28 to clinch the American League pennant.

He was 17-8 with seven saves and had 16 complete games in 1951. Reynolds struck out 126 in 221 innings, and tied for the major league lead with seven shutouts. He finished second in the Most Valuable Player voting to Philadelphia's Bobby Shantz.

Reynolds was 131-60 with 41 saves in eight seasons with the Yankees. He was a member of the Yankees All-Star team selected by former manager Casey Stengel and was awarded a plaque in Monument Park located beyond the center field fence at Yankee Stadium in 1989.

Instrumental off the field as well, Reynolds served as both the Yankees' and the American League's player representative and helped to construct the major league baseball pension plan that remains the finest in professional sports.
 

Tony Sellari
C, 1965-67
Aliquippa, Pa.
Class of 2002

Tony Sellari was a two-sport star for Oklahoma State in the mid-1960's that made a definite impact on the Cowboy athletic scene.

Sellari was a three-year starter at catcher for the Cowboy baseball team from 1965-67 while also starting three seasons at receiver for the football team from 1964-66. He was the defensive backbone of the 1966 and 1967 baseball squads that advanced to the College World Series.

Sellari came to Oklahoma State from Aliquippa, Pa. and became a starter at catcher in his sophomore year. He had a breakout campaign, leading the team with a .376 batting average and made the All-Big Eight team. He was known as a consistent hitter, hitting safely in 20 of 24 games in 1965. The team finished with a 14-11 record, a significant improvement over the previous season when the team went 6-14.

In 1966, the team continued the vast improvements on the field, sporting a 21-11 record which included a trip to the College World Series for the first time in five years. The team advanced to the championship game before falling to Ohio State 8-2. While Sellari slumped offensively, batting only .228 in 1966, he came up huge defensively for the Cowboys during the season and especially in the CWS where he threw out an astonishing nine of 11 base runners. He once again earned all-conference honors and set the stage for a outstanding senior year.

Sellari rebounded offensively in 1967 and once again led the team with a .316 batting average. He helped guide the team to a second straight College World Series appearance and was named to the All-Big Eight team for the third consecutive year. Sellari capped off the team's 15-10 campaign when he was named a first team All-American by the American Baseball Coaches Association.

On the gridiron, Sellari led the Cowboys in receiving in 1964 and 1965 and finished his career with 48 receptions for 562 yards and a touchdown.

For his outstanding contributions on the baseball diamond and on the football field, Sellari was voted Oklahoma State's best all-around athlete following the 1966-67 school year.

Following the completion of his senior year in 1967, Sellari signed a free agent contract with the Chicago White Sox. He currently resides in West Palm Beach, Fla.
 

Mitchel Simons
2B, OF, 1988-90
Midwest City, Okla.
Class of 2000

Simons was a mainstay in the middle infield for the Pokes from 1988-90 and was a major factor in the Cowboys success in the late '80s. Simons made his mark primarily as a lead off hitter and team leader.

Simons started 41 games as a freshman in 1988 and hit .289 with 10 doubles and seven home runs to go along with 31 RBIs. He proved to be a threat on the base paths as well with 12 stolen bases in 15 attempts. Simons elevated his play in Big Eight action, hitting .370 in 21 conference games. He also shone against arch-rival Wichita State, hitting three homers with seven RBIs in five contests against the Shockers.

In 1989, Simons was the full-time starter at second base earning All-Big Eight honors in the process. He batted .368 with 11 homers and 53 RBIs while also stealing 32 bases in 39 attempts. Simons led the team in runs (81) and hits (85) and set the school record for put outs by a second baseman with 149. He once again played at a high level in Big Eight contests, batting .369 and scoring a team-leading 37 runs. Simons earned Most Valuable Player honors at the Big Eight tournament after a 10-for-19 performance at the plate with three doubles, a home run and six RBIs. He scored a tournament record 10 runs and hit safely in all four games he played in.

By his junior season in 1990, Simons was considered one of the premiere lead off hitters in the country. He hit .353 with a team-leading 96 hits in 272 at-bats, also a team high. His 89 runs scored not only led Oklahoma State but the nation. Simons also wrapped out a team-high 22 doubles to go along with 11 home runs. After the season he picked up several postseason honors including being named a third team All-America by the American Baseball Coaches Association, the West II Regional MVP and a first team All-Big Eight selection. Simons stepped up his play in the post season hitting .400 in the Big Eight Tournament and .421 in the West II Regional. He continued his hot play into the College World Series hitting .400 (6-for-15 in four games). Simons helped lead the Cowboys to the NCAA title game against Georgia. He went 2-for-3 in the game and scored the Pokes lone run in the 2-1 loss to the Bulldogs.

A preseason All-America in 1991, Simons was drafted in the 23rd round by the Montreal Expos in the amateur baseball draft. He played the 1999 season for the Charlotte Knights, the Triple-A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox, and helped the team advance to the Triple-A World Series.
 

Dick Soergel
RHP, 1958-60
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Class of 1994

Soergel lettered three years in baseball, basketball and football.

In basketball, he averaged 5.6 points and 1.9 rebounds per game in 63 games for his career.

In football, he led the Pokes in passing for three years, was 10th in the nation in passing in 1959 with 1,102, and he still owns one of the longest pass plays in OSU history (75 yards). In 1958, he led OSU to a victory in the Bluegrass Bowl, connecting on 6-of-7 passes for 77 yards. He ranks among the Cowboys all-time passing leaders with 2,226 yards and was drafted by the New England Patriots in 1960.

In baseball, Soergel pitched three years for the Cowboys. In 1958, he went 4-0 in 32 innings pitched with 17 strikeouts and an ERA of 0.82.

In 1959, he went 8-1 in 64 innings pitched with 66 strikeouts and an ERA of 2.10. He also threw a one-hitter against Iowa State on May 16, 1959.

In 1960, Soergel was 6-2 in 59 innings pitched with 54 strikeouts and an ERA of 1.98. He was named All-Big Eight and All-America that year.
 

Mickey Tettleton
Outfielder/Catcher, 1979-81
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Class of 1992

Tettleton played right field and catcher during his career with the Cowboys. He was selected to the all-tournament team at the 1981 NCAA College World Series.

Tettleton was drafted in the fifth round by Oakland in the 1981 Major League Baseball Amateur Draft. He made his major-league debut June 30, 1984, at Toronto and collected his first major league hit on July 15, 1984 against the Blue Jays.

He opened the 1987 and 1988 seasons as Oakland's starting catcher but was hampered by injuries both seasons. Playing with Baltimore in 1988, he became the 36th player in major league history to hit a home run from both sides of the plate on June 13 at Detroit.

Tettleton played his first full season in the major leagues in 1989 and hit .268 with 21 doubles, 26 home runs and 85 RBIs. He was chosen to the 1989 American League All-Star team and was named the starting catcher on the AP Major League All-Star team and The Sporting News and UPI American League All-Star teams. He also received the Silver Slugger Award as the top offensive catcher in the American League, this in spite of having knee surgery midway through the season that caused him to miss 29 games. Tettleton led all major league catchers in 1990 with 68 runs scored and finished second in the league with 106 walks.

He was traded to Detroit during the off-season and responded with another solid season in 1991. He was named to the Associated Press Major League All-Star team, The Sporting News American League All-Star team and the United Press International All-Star team and again received the Silver Slugger Award as the top offensive catcher.

During the 1991 season, Tettleton set career highs in nearly every offensive category, including home runs (31), RBIs (89), runs (85) and hits (132). He became the first Detroit catcher to hit a home run over the roof of Tiger Stadium and did it twice in 1991, becoming only the third Tiger in history to hit two home runs over the roof in the same season.

Tettleton followed up in 1992 with a career-best 32 home runs and ranked first in the American League with a .966 fielding percentage behind the plate. His career-best 122 walks tied him for first in the American league with Frank Thomas and were the most in Tiger history since 1961.

Tettleton led the Tigers in 1993 with 32 home runs and was second on the team with 110 RBIs.

After the 1994 season Tettleton signed with the Texas Rangers. He hit 32 homers and 78 RBIs with Texas in 1995 and helped lead the Rangers to a division title in 1997 with 24 homers and 83 RBIs. Injuries forced him to retire from baseball during the 1997 campaign.
 

Jim Traber
First Baseman, 1980-82
Columbia, Md.
Class of 1992

Traber hit a school and Big Eight record 26 doubles in 1981. He led the team with a .396 batting average and had 69 RBIs. Notched another school-record with 84 base hits and led the team in home runs with 11.

In 1982, he hit .378 to lead the team in batting average and base hits with 85. Traber collected a school-record 75 RBIs with 16 doubles, two triples and 14 home runs.

He was named first-team All-Big Eight by the league coaches in 1981 and was also the starting quarterback on the Cowboy football team the same year.

Traber hit .415 as a freshman in 1980 in 25 games. He had two doubles and four home runs along with 15 RBIs. He also walked six times, stole three bases and scored six runs.

In 1982 Traber was drafted in the 21st round of the 1982 amateur draft by Baltimore and played in the major leagues for the Orioles from 1986 to 1989.

He was a member of the Kintetsu Buffaloes of the Japanese Professional Baseball League from 1990 to 1991 and played for Monterrey of the Mexican League in 1993.

Traber is currently a sportscaster in Oklahoma City.
 

Wayne Weatherly
OF, 1966-68
Stillwater, Okla.
Class of 1999

Wayne Weatherly was a multi-dimensional outfielder for the Cowboys during the 1966-68 seasons.

Weatherly was named to the College World Series All-Decade Team of the 1960s after leading OSU to three straight CWS appearances during his career.

He was an All-American and All-Big Eight selection in 1968 and was a CWS All-Tournament selection after the 1966 and 1968 seasons.

Weatherly finished his collegiate career with a .287 batting average and 48 RBIs.

He signed a professional baseball contract with the Chicago White Sox after the 1968 season.
 

Robbie Wine
Catcher, 1981-83
Norristown, Pa.
Class of 1993

Wine is the most decorated catcher in Oklahoma State history. He helped OSU win three-straight Big Eight and NCAA Regional titles en route to three consecutive appearances in the NCAA College World Series from 1981-1983.

He was named first-team All-America as a sophomore in 1982 by the American Baseball Coaches Association and The Sporting News and was a second-team All-America by Baseball America. The Sporting News also named him Player of the Year for 1982.

Wine hit .364 in 1982 with a team-leading 18 doubles, two triples and a school-record 19 home runs. He also set the school record for total bases with 155, finished the season with a team-leading 70 RBIs and had a team-leading .742 slugging percentage.

Wine set a school record for most assists by a catcher with 44 and set the school record for most putouts by a catcher with 409.

He was a first-team All-Big Eight choice by the league coaches in 1982 and 1983, and he was voted to the all-tournament team at the 1982 Big Eight Tournament.

Wine hit .274 as a junior in 1983 with 10 doubles, 13 home runs and 45 RBIs.

Wine was drafted in the first round of the 1983 amateur draft by the Houston Astros. He was the eighth pick of the first round, making him the highest draft selection in OSU history.

As a minor leaguer, Wine was all-star selection in the New York Penn League in 1983, the Florida State League in 1984 and the Southern League in 1985. He was named the Most Valuable Player of the 1985 Southern League All-Star game.

In September of 1986, Wine was called up by the Astros. He made his major-league debut in the Astros' 18-inning, 8-7 win over Chicago on September 23. He entered the game in the 10th inning and threw out a pair of runners, while also collecting a hit in his first major league at-bat (a single off Guy Hoffman in the 13th). Wine made the most of his first major league start on Sept. 27, 1986 at Atlanta by going 2-for-4 with a double and two runs scored.

Wine joined the Milwaukee Brewers in 1993 and served as a bullpen catcher and bullpen coach at the major league level.

In 1996, Wine came back to Oklahoma State as an assistant coach in charge of hitting. He left OSU after the 2004 season to take the head coaching position at Penn State.
 

Jim Wixson
RHP, 1960-62
Tulsa, Okla.
Class of 1996

One of only eight Cowboy hurlers to ever pitch a no-hitter, Wixson's was by far the most important one in the history of the program. His no-hitter against North Carolina at the College World Series in 1960 helped propel the Cowboys into the championship semifinals.

Wixson came out of nowhere in 1960 and established himself as one of the top pitchers in the country. During his tenure with the Cowboys, Oklahoma State finished 2nd twice and 10th in the final regular season polls.

As a sophomore in 1960, Wixson finished with a 2-0 ledger and a miniscule 0.95 ERA.

In his junior season, Wixson posted an 11-0 mark and was named an American Baseball Coaches Association First Team All-American selection as well as an All-Big Eight honoree. The Tulsa native helped lead the Cowboys to the NCAA championship game where they fell just short, losing to Southern California 1-0.

Wixson finished his collegiate career by going 5-3 in 1962 with a 2.89 ERA in 53 innings pitched. He along with Larry Ferguson (5) recorded 10 of Oklahoma State's 11 wins that season.

 

Pistol Pete's Partners Bedlam Series
Live Mas On The Road
Scoreboard Message Vivid Tickets
Store
verizon united vivid